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AvaDenali.com

Coat Racks

Commercial coat racks come in several types: standing, rolling, folding, and wall mounted coat racks.  And of course, coat trees, a type of standing coat rack.  Every unit here is a sturdy heavy duty coat rack designed for use in public spaces, with high weight capacities and durable industrial grade finishes.

Some folks are most concerned about finding a particular material such as metal or wood, or a particular finish such as black or chrome.  You'll find all of them here.

Still not convinced you're in the right place?  Consider that every coat rack here ships for free within the contiguous 48 states.

Questions?  Please give us a call at 800-727-1485 or email us at info@avadenali.com and we'll provide the answers.

Coat Rack Considerations

Each type of coat rack has several aspects that will affect how well it works for your particular situation.

Purpose

What are you going to be hanging?  Is the rack for winter coats or dress jackets or lab coats or firefighting turnout gear?  Weight capacity and hanging method need to be appropriate. 

How many people does it need to serve?  Hanging capacity is always an issue.

Do you have enough room for it?  Estimates are all well and good, but a tape measure is a marvelous invention.  The use of a tape measure can prevent a person from inadvertently getting a coat rack that's four feet wide to put into a space that's only three feet wide.

Will the general public be using it?  For how long?  If you're hanging guests' jackets for short periods of time, a wall mounted coat hook panel might be the best.  On the other end of the spectrum, if you're furnishing a hotel, you're going to want a wall mounted unit with a rod for coat hangers.  But you probably want to use hangers that are attached and won't accidentally leave with the guests.

What sort of environment is it going into?  If you're buying a rack to hang hard hats and tool belts, you'll probably prefer plain and sturdy with no frills.  If you're getting one for a bank's lobby, you may want one that's just as sturdy, but with a little more style.

Climate

If you live in Minneapolis, your winter is a bit different than that of Miami.  Coats and jackets, of necessity, have different dimensions. 

The fouler the weather, the more foul weather gear people have.  Scarves and hats and overshoes become required, so shelves and boot racks become useful.

Your area's climate affects the next aspect: Hanging Capacity. 

Hanging Capacity

People often ask how many coats they can hang on a coat rack that uses a coat hanger rod.  The easy answer: On average, you can hang four coats per linear foot on a rack that uses a hanger rod.  That's allowing three inches per coat. 

Take a look at your winter coat.  How thick is it?  If you're in Miami, you likely have a much different answer than the person making this measurement in Minneapolis.  So, take your own winter coat and figure out how many coats just like it could be hung side-by-side in a 12" space.  Now, you have your own local-climate-adjusted hanging capacity.  Can you mash more coats in there?  Maybe.  That's up to you.

In the same twelve inch space, you could easily hang a dozen lab coats or uniform shirts and it wouldn't be crowded. 

The point is that it's really not the coat rack that determines hanging capacity, it's what's hanging on it. 

Weight Capacity

The other aspect of capacity is weight.  How much weight can it support?  The safe answer is: it depends on what type it is, but the commercial coat racks found here support a minimum of 25 pounds per linear foot.  Ava believes that's the absolute minimum.  If a coat rack can't support at least that much, you won't find it here. 

So, let's just list Ava's minimum standards for weight capacity:

  • Coat Tree: 30 Pounds Overall, Evenly Distributed
  • Folding: 25 Pounds Per Linear Foot
  • Standing or Rolling: 25 Pounds Per Linear Foot
  • Wall Mounted with Coat Hanger Rod: 40 Pounds Per Linear Foot for Hanger Rods
  • Wall Mounted with Coat Hooks: 40 Pounds per Coat Hook Mount

Wall Mounted capacities are dependent on proper installation of the coat rack using surface-appropriate anchors. 

Important: These are Ava's minimum standards for commercial coat racks and should NOT be applied to coat racks not found here.  There are a great many coat racks that don't meet these standards.  You just won't find them here.

Hanging Methods

Do you prefer hooks or hangers?  You can get either or, in some instances, both on the same rack.  You can even use hangers on hooks. 

Coat hooks use one of two attachment methods.  They either attach to a vertical surface such as a panel or coat tree or they attach to the underside of a shelf. 

The hooks that attach to vertical surfaces are often also available as single units so you can have the same style on doors or walls in locations, such as private offices, where a single coat hook works best.  The ones that attach to the undersides of shelves are rather plain and just provide hanging capability without any aesthetic aspirations.  Ones that attach to vertical surfaces usually have more design style. 

The nice thing about a coat hook is that it's quick and easy to use.  Now, (despite what many kids seem to think,) it's not exactly hard labor to hang something on a coat hanger, but it's just easier to hang something from a hook than on a hanger.  If you're cycling a lot of visitors through a lobby or exam room or similar areas, hooks are faster and easier.

If you're expecting to hang items for longer periods of time, a coat rack with a rod for coat hangers may be the better answer, because a hanger maintains the shape of the garment and spreads the weight of the garment across a wider area rather than on the prongs of a coat hook.  Coat hangers are better for dressier garments. 

Coat hangers come in two styles.  The open loop style is the type most people use daily.  Anti-theft coat hangers use several different methods, but are designed so your nice coat hangers are more likely to remain where they belong rather than accidentally being carried away.

Finally, don't forget about where the rack is going to be.  Carl the carpenter doesn't expect Frank the foreman to take his coat and hang it delicately on a hanger in the construction trailer.  However, in other circumstances, it's a nice gesture to take a guest's coat and hang it with care on a hanger prior to your meeting in the conference room.  Situations differ.

Footprint

The footprint is how much floor space the rack needs for easy use.  A coat tree or a wall mounted coat rack without a shelf takes up very little.  Of course, all racks take up their own dimensions, but you need to remember to allow for accessibility corridors. 

If you're using a unit that uses coat hanger rods, note that coat hangers extend out past the rod by around 8-1/2", even without any clothes hanging on them.  (Most coat hangers measure 17" wide.)  Add another 1-1/2" for when something is hanging on it (see Climate).  So, if you have a coat rack that measures 14" front-to-back and uses a coat hanger rod, you can figure that configuration uses 14" plus about 10" for each side that uses a hanger rod. 

The units that take up the most room are double-sided standing coat racks that use coat hanger rods. 

A wall mounted coat rack without a shelf has the smallest footprint; all you need is an access corridor.

Durability

The coat racks here are designed for commercial use.  Of course you can use these at home, but that's not their intended purpose. 

These are designed for decades of hard daily use in public environments, often by people who aren't quite as careful as one might wish.  If you're looking for a rather cheap coat rack meant for residential use, these won't fit your intent. 

These coat racks are designed to still be working after you retire.

Now that we've reviewed the things you may want to consider, here's a brief look at the pros and cons of each type.

Coat Rack Types

Coat Trees

Coat Trees just sit in the corner.  They're unobtrusive and portable, but have low hanging capacities.  Of course, that may be all you need. 

For safety's sake, the most important feature of a coat tree is that it has either a broad enough base or a heavy enough base so that it can withstand loading coats on only one side without falling over. Every one you'll find here fits that requirement. 

The next most important feature is that it has to provide enough hanging capacity to service the number of people expecting to use it.  Coat trees usually have at least four hang points; some have up to a dozen but that's rather unusual.

Coat trees can fit into just about any environment from a bar to a boardroom.  They come in every style from the most basic to the leading edge of sophisticated design.

  • Pro: Small Footprint and Portable
  • Con: Low Capacity

Coat Tree

Folding Coat Racks

Folding Coat Racks are for situations where large numbers of people come together at intermittent times.  While most coat racks serve a fixed number of people on a daily basis, folding coat racks are intended for events where a large number of people will be gathering.  These units always have high capacities to accommodate large groups.

The best thing about a folding coat rack is that it serves the purpose when it's needed, but folds away for storage when it's not needed. However, the mechanism which gives it the ability to fold up for storage adds to the cost of this type of coat rack.

Casters are included to allow you to roll it from point-to-point as needed.  

Folding coat racks are designed to be extremely durable, because it's expected that in some instances they'll be treated roughly, moved around frequently, and used fairly often in some locations, such as convention centers and activity centers.

The downside of these units is their comparatively high cost because of all the included features and their large size.  With a folding coat rack, you get a product that can do anything a coat rack might reasonably be expected to do, plus fold away for storage.  However, like everything else in Life, the more versatile an item is, the more it costs. 

Folding coat racks are usually used by convention centers, activity centers, hotels, schools and churches. 

  • Pro: High Capacity, Portable, Folds Away for Storage, Over-Engineered Durability
  • Con: Costs the Most due to Versatility

Folding Coat Rack

Standing Coat Racks

Standing Coat Racks might be the best answer if you need a coat rack for a limited number of people, but that number of people is more than a coat tree alone can serve.

The downside of a standing coat rack is that they rarely exceed four feet wide, with the maximum being five feet.  Of course, this limits their capacity but they still have more than a coat tree.  Although the width is limited, these are available in both single-sided and double-sided versions.  A double-sided standing coat rack gives you double the hanging space, but requires enough floor space to be able to access both sides.

Why not build them wider?  It's because you'd have to use more support structure to keep them from bowing in the middle.  The additional support structure would increase the materials cost which would increase the selling price.  Because of the required increase in price, few people would buy them. 

Need to move it?  Although one person can move one of these units, just because of the width it takes two people to easily do so.  If you expect to move it regularly, just get a rolling coat rack.  You'll be glad you did.

  • Pro: Higher Capacity than a Coat Tree, Semi-Portable
  • Con: Limited Capacity due to Width Limitations

Standing Coat Rack

Rolling Coat Racks

Regarding Rolling Coat Racks: see standing coat racks.  Add wheels.  Now you have a standing coat rack that easily rolls to wherever it's needed right now. 

Not everyone has this requirement, which is why it's an option. On the other hand, adding casters really doesn't add much to the cost, but increases the versatility. 

Another nice thing about rolling coat racks is that they're very easy to move to clean beneath.  If you're in a climate where people regularly track outside elements such as moisture or mud into the space, you may appreciate this aspect.  If you're considering a coat rack with a boot rack on it for overshoes, do yourself a favor and add casters.

  • Pro: Higher Capacity than a Coat Tree, Easy Mobility
  • Con: Limited Capacity due to Width Limitations

Rolling Coat Rack

Wall Mounted Coat Racks

Wall Mounted Coat Racks are available with or without shelves, to serve different needs.  You'll save money initially by not having to buy a floor-standing frame to support the rack. 

You may have noted, in the overview of weight capacity, that these have greater weight capacity than any other type of coat rack.  There are two different reasons for that, which are explained below in the appropriate sections. 

But, while we're on the subject, let's discuss attaching coat racks to the wall. Weight capacity has very little to do with the structure of the coat rack itself.  The materials used in the coat rack are strong enough to easily meet the 40 pounds per linear foot weight capacity.  No, what puts a limit on capacity is the wall itself.  An overloaded coat rack will pull out of the wall.  The materials in the coat rack itself won't fail before the wall does.

First, let's note that a wall mounted coat rack must be attached to the wall using surface-appropriate anchors.  In other words, if you're going into wood, use wood anchors.  If you're going into masonry, use masonry anchors.  If you're going into sheetrock, also known as drywall, use hollow-wall anchors.  Don't scrimp on this.  This is not the place to save money.  If there is a hole in the bracket or wall strip in which an anchor is supposed to be placed, put one there.

Second, there are installers that will absolutely insist that each bracket must be in a stud in dry wall.  Over forty years of installation experience and literally thousands of wall mounted coat rack installations emphatically disagrees.  The standard for sheetrock for commercial facilities is 5/8" thick.  If you place a correctly installed appropriate hollow-wall anchor into 5/8" sheetrock for every single bracket or wall strip anchor hole, you will attain the weight capacity mentioned earlier.

That being said, if you have the opportunity to hit studs or, even better, install blocking in the wall, that's great.  It can only make the installation stronger.  This is the equivalent of wearing suspenders with your belt.  From a safety standpoint, there's not a thing wrong with doing so.  It's just not absolutely necessary.

The biggest downside to these units is that you need to have someone mount your coat rack on the wall.  You'll need to drill holes in the wall, use surface-appropriate anchors, and get it straight and level.  There are many people, such as carpenters, who can easily do this, but it's not a skill that just everyone has on their resume.  However, if a person can hang three pictures in a row and have them all come out aligned with each other, they can likely hang a wall mounted coat rack.  Instructions are provided.

Portable?  Not in the least bit.  Yes, if you move from one location to another, you can remove these coat racks from the wall and reinstall them at the new site.  But overall, movement in an installed wall mounted coat rack is not a desirable thing and indicates the aforementioned "provided instructions" weren't followed.

Wall Coat Racks without Shelves

In most cases, a Wall Coat Rack without a Shelf is simply a wall mounted metal or wood panel with coat hooks already mounted on the panel. These types of coat racks are often called coat hook panels or coat hook strips.

In a few instances, you may find these with a coat hanger rod in addition to, or instead of, coat hooks.  However, in terms of capacity, usually a wall coat rack without a shelf is basically a coat tree attached to a wall. 

These don't take up much room and require no floor space.  They also tend to cost less than a coat tree, simply because they don't need the structure that enables a coat tree to be freestanding.

As noted earlier, wall mounted coat racks have greater weight capacities than any other type of coat rack.  In the case of the units without shelves, the reason for this is that the lever is short.  In other words, a properly anchored wall coat rack without a shelf doesn't have much leverage to pull it out of the wall.  This is just physics at work in your favor.

A charming aspect of these is that you can often match the other coat hooks you have in your facility.  Let's say you have an open area where most people hang up their coats on wall coat racks, but you also have private offices.  In many cases, you can find coat hooks which exactly match the style of the coat hooks on the wall coat racks.  Now, some folks may shrug at this.  Please be assured that the majority of design professionals are quite pleased with this feature, since it gives them an opportunity to maintain continuity of design.  That's the sort of thing design professionals work rather hard to accomplish. 

The final feature goes back to hanging capacity.  In some instances, these wall coat racks can be mounted end-to-end, changing everything earlier written about these units having the capacity of a coat tree.  To every rule, there are exceptions, eh?  In this case, the only limitation is the length of your wall.  However, if this is important to you, you may want to check out the next item: Wall Coat Racks with Shelves.

  • Pro: No Floor Space Requirement, Low Comparative Cost, Greater Weight Capacity, Easy Design Continuity
  • Con: Limited Capacity in Many Instances, Requires Installation, Immobile

Wall Coat Rack without Shelf

Wall Coat Racks with Shelves

You get the most bang for your buck with these.   Wall Coat Racks with Shelves deliver Unlimited Size.  Capacity is limited only by the amount of wall space you can dedicate to them. 

A feature of this type of coat rack is that some of these units can be cut to exact lengths, down to eighth inches.  If you have a wall which is 27'8-3/8" long that you want to fill, you can get a wall mounted coat rack custom-cut at the factory to that length.

If you're a facility manager needing to provide permanent hanging storage for dozens or even hundreds of people, this is the route to take.  All you need are walls of adequate length. 

The shelf provides overhead storage for things that don't fit on hangers or hooks.  The units can come with single or double shelves.  You can even provide another wall-mounted shelf below for storage of footwear, if need be.  After all, you're dedicating a wall, you may as well get all the utility you can out of that space. 

These units are available with either coat hanger rods or coat hooks. 

As to why these have the maximum weight capacity, the answer is very simple: There is a support bracket every couple of feet. 

  • Pros: Capacity Limited only by Wall Space, Comparatively Inexpensive, Greater Weight Capacity, Maximum Storage Options, Coat Hangers or Coat Hooks Options
  • Cons: Requires Installation, Immobile

Wall Coat Rack with Shelf

If you have questions or comments, please give us a call at 800-727-1485 or email us at info@avadenali.com.

Categories

Categories

Coat Racks

Commercial coat racks come in several types: standing, rolling, folding, and wall mounted coat racks.  And of course, coat trees, a type of standing coat rack.  Every unit here is a sturdy heavy duty coat rack designed for use in public spaces, with high weight capacities and durable industrial grade finishes.

Some folks are most concerned about finding a particular material such as metal or wood, or a particular finish such as black or chrome.  You'll find all of them here.

Still not convinced you're in the right place?  Consider that every coat rack here ships for free within the contiguous 48 states.

Questions?  Please give us a call at 800-727-1485 or email us at info@avadenali.com and we'll provide the answers.

Coat Rack Considerations

Each type of coat rack has several aspects that will affect how well it works for your particular situation.

Purpose

What are you going to be hanging?  Is the rack for winter coats or dress jackets or lab coats or firefighting turnout gear?  Weight capacity and hanging method need to be appropriate. 

How many people does it need to serve?  Hanging capacity is always an issue.

Do you have enough room for it?  Estimates are all well and good, but a tape measure is a marvelous invention.  The use of a tape measure can prevent a person from inadvertently getting a coat rack that's four feet wide to put into a space that's only three feet wide.

Will the general public be using it?  For how long?  If you're hanging guests' jackets for short periods of time, a wall mounted coat hook panel might be the best.  On the other end of the spectrum, if you're furnishing a hotel, you're going to want a wall mounted unit with a rod for coat hangers.  But you probably want to use hangers that are attached and won't accidentally leave with the guests.

What sort of environment is it going into?  If you're buying a rack to hang hard hats and tool belts, you'll probably prefer plain and sturdy with no frills.  If you're getting one for a bank's lobby, you may want one that's just as sturdy, but with a little more style.

Climate

If you live in Minneapolis, your winter is a bit different than that of Miami.  Coats and jackets, of necessity, have different dimensions. 

The fouler the weather, the more foul weather gear people have.  Scarves and hats and overshoes become required, so shelves and boot racks become useful.

Your area's climate affects the next aspect: Hanging Capacity. 

Hanging Capacity

People often ask how many coats they can hang on a coat rack that uses a coat hanger rod.  The easy answer: On average, you can hang four coats per linear foot on a rack that uses a hanger rod.  That's allowing three inches per coat. 

Take a look at your winter coat.  How thick is it?  If you're in Miami, you likely have a much different answer than the person making this measurement in Minneapolis.  So, take your own winter coat and figure out how many coats just like it could be hung side-by-side in a 12" space.  Now, you have your own local-climate-adjusted hanging capacity.  Can you mash more coats in there?  Maybe.  That's up to you.

In the same twelve inch space, you could easily hang a dozen lab coats or uniform shirts and it wouldn't be crowded. 

The point is that it's really not the coat rack that determines hanging capacity, it's what's hanging on it. 

Weight Capacity

The other aspect of capacity is weight.  How much weight can it support?  The safe answer is: it depends on what type it is, but the commercial coat racks found here support a minimum of 25 pounds per linear foot.  Ava believes that's the absolute minimum.  If a coat rack can't support at least that much, you won't find it here. 

So, let's just list Ava's minimum standards for weight capacity:

  • Coat Tree: 30 Pounds Overall, Evenly Distributed
  • Folding: 25 Pounds Per Linear Foot
  • Standing or Rolling: 25 Pounds Per Linear Foot
  • Wall Mounted with Coat Hanger Rod: 40 Pounds Per Linear Foot for Hanger Rods
  • Wall Mounted with Coat Hooks: 40 Pounds per Coat Hook Mount

Wall Mounted capacities are dependent on proper installation of the coat rack using surface-appropriate anchors. 

Important: These are Ava's minimum standards for commercial coat racks and should NOT be applied to coat racks not found here.  There are a great many coat racks that don't meet these standards.  You just won't find them here.

Hanging Methods

Do you prefer hooks or hangers?  You can get either or, in some instances, both on the same rack.  You can even use hangers on hooks. 

Coat hooks use one of two attachment methods.  They either attach to a vertical surface such as a panel or coat tree or they attach to the underside of a shelf. 

The hooks that attach to vertical surfaces are often also available as single units so you can have the same style on doors or walls in locations, such as private offices, where a single coat hook works best.  The ones that attach to the undersides of shelves are rather plain and just provide hanging capability without any aesthetic aspirations.  Ones that attach to vertical surfaces usually have more design style. 

The nice thing about a coat hook is that it's quick and easy to use.  Now, (despite what many kids seem to think,) it's not exactly hard labor to hang something on a coat hanger, but it's just easier to hang something from a hook than on a hanger.  If you're cycling a lot of visitors through a lobby or exam room or similar areas, hooks are faster and easier.

If you're expecting to hang items for longer periods of time, a coat rack with a rod for coat hangers may be the better answer, because a hanger maintains the shape of the garment and spreads the weight of the garment across a wider area rather than on the prongs of a coat hook.  Coat hangers are better for dressier garments. 

Coat hangers come in two styles.  The open loop style is the type most people use daily.  Anti-theft coat hangers use several different methods, but are designed so your nice coat hangers are more likely to remain where they belong rather than accidentally being carried away.

Finally, don't forget about where the rack is going to be.  Carl the carpenter doesn't expect Frank the foreman to take his coat and hang it delicately on a hanger in the construction trailer.  However, in other circumstances, it's a nice gesture to take a guest's coat and hang it with care on a hanger prior to your meeting in the conference room.  Situations differ.

Footprint

The footprint is how much floor space the rack needs for easy use.  A coat tree or a wall mounted coat rack without a shelf takes up very little.  Of course, all racks take up their own dimensions, but you need to remember to allow for accessibility corridors. 

If you're using a unit that uses coat hanger rods, note that coat hangers extend out past the rod by around 8-1/2", even without any clothes hanging on them.  (Most coat hangers measure 17" wide.)  Add another 1-1/2" for when something is hanging on it (see Climate).  So, if you have a coat rack that measures 14" front-to-back and uses a coat hanger rod, you can figure that configuration uses 14" plus about 10" for each side that uses a hanger rod. 

The units that take up the most room are double-sided standing coat racks that use coat hanger rods. 

A wall mounted coat rack without a shelf has the smallest footprint; all you need is an access corridor.

Durability

The coat racks here are designed for commercial use.  Of course you can use these at home, but that's not their intended purpose. 

These are designed for decades of hard daily use in public environments, often by people who aren't quite as careful as one might wish.  If you're looking for a rather cheap coat rack meant for residential use, these won't fit your intent. 

These coat racks are designed to still be working after you retire.

Now that we've reviewed the things you may want to consider, here's a brief look at the pros and cons of each type.

Coat Rack Types

Coat Trees

Coat Trees just sit in the corner.  They're unobtrusive and portable, but have low hanging capacities.  Of course, that may be all you need. 

For safety's sake, the most important feature of a coat tree is that it has either a broad enough base or a heavy enough base so that it can withstand loading coats on only one side without falling over. Every one you'll find here fits that requirement. 

The next most important feature is that it has to provide enough hanging capacity to service the number of people expecting to use it.  Coat trees usually have at least four hang points; some have up to a dozen but that's rather unusual.

Coat trees can fit into just about any environment from a bar to a boardroom.  They come in every style from the most basic to the leading edge of sophisticated design.

  • Pro: Small Footprint and Portable
  • Con: Low Capacity

Coat Tree

Folding Coat Racks

Folding Coat Racks are for situations where large numbers of people come together at intermittent times.  While most coat racks serve a fixed number of people on a daily basis, folding coat racks are intended for events where a large number of people will be gathering.  These units always have high capacities to accommodate large groups.

The best thing about a folding coat rack is that it serves the purpose when it's needed, but folds away for storage when it's not needed. However, the mechanism which gives it the ability to fold up for storage adds to the cost of this type of coat rack.

Casters are included to allow you to roll it from point-to-point as needed.  

Folding coat racks are designed to be extremely durable, because it's expected that in some instances they'll be treated roughly, moved around frequently, and used fairly often in some locations, such as convention centers and activity centers.

The downside of these units is their comparatively high cost because of all the included features and their large size.  With a folding coat rack, you get a product that can do anything a coat rack might reasonably be expected to do, plus fold away for storage.  However, like everything else in Life, the more versatile an item is, the more it costs. 

Folding coat racks are usually used by convention centers, activity centers, hotels, schools and churches. 

  • Pro: High Capacity, Portable, Folds Away for Storage, Over-Engineered Durability
  • Con: Costs the Most due to Versatility

Folding Coat Rack

Standing Coat Racks

Standing Coat Racks might be the best answer if you need a coat rack for a limited number of people, but that number of people is more than a coat tree alone can serve.

The downside of a standing coat rack is that they rarely exceed four feet wide, with the maximum being five feet.  Of course, this limits their capacity but they still have more than a coat tree.  Although the width is limited, these are available in both single-sided and double-sided versions.  A double-sided standing coat rack gives you double the hanging space, but requires enough floor space to be able to access both sides.

Why not build them wider?  It's because you'd have to use more support structure to keep them from bowing in the middle.  The additional support structure would increase the materials cost which would increase the selling price.  Because of the required increase in price, few people would buy them. 

Need to move it?  Although one person can move one of these units, just because of the width it takes two people to easily do so.  If you expect to move it regularly, just get a rolling coat rack.  You'll be glad you did.

  • Pro: Higher Capacity than a Coat Tree, Semi-Portable
  • Con: Limited Capacity due to Width Limitations

Standing Coat Rack

Rolling Coat Racks

Regarding Rolling Coat Racks: see standing coat racks.  Add wheels.  Now you have a standing coat rack that easily rolls to wherever it's needed right now. 

Not everyone has this requirement, which is why it's an option. On the other hand, adding casters really doesn't add much to the cost, but increases the versatility. 

Another nice thing about rolling coat racks is that they're very easy to move to clean beneath.  If you're in a climate where people regularly track outside elements such as moisture or mud into the space, you may appreciate this aspect.  If you're considering a coat rack with a boot rack on it for overshoes, do yourself a favor and add casters.

  • Pro: Higher Capacity than a Coat Tree, Easy Mobility
  • Con: Limited Capacity due to Width Limitations

Rolling Coat Rack

Wall Mounted Coat Racks

Wall Mounted Coat Racks are available with or without shelves, to serve different needs.  You'll save money initially by not having to buy a floor-standing frame to support the rack. 

You may have noted, in the overview of weight capacity, that these have greater weight capacity than any other type of coat rack.  There are two different reasons for that, which are explained below in the appropriate sections. 

But, while we're on the subject, let's discuss attaching coat racks to the wall. Weight capacity has very little to do with the structure of the coat rack itself.  The materials used in the coat rack are strong enough to easily meet the 40 pounds per linear foot weight capacity.  No, what puts a limit on capacity is the wall itself.  An overloaded coat rack will pull out of the wall.  The materials in the coat rack itself won't fail before the wall does.

First, let's note that a wall mounted coat rack must be attached to the wall using surface-appropriate anchors.  In other words, if you're going into wood, use wood anchors.  If you're going into masonry, use masonry anchors.  If you're going into sheetrock, also known as drywall, use hollow-wall anchors.  Don't scrimp on this.  This is not the place to save money.  If there is a hole in the bracket or wall strip in which an anchor is supposed to be placed, put one there.

Second, there are installers that will absolutely insist that each bracket must be in a stud in dry wall.  Over forty years of installation experience and literally thousands of wall mounted coat rack installations emphatically disagrees.  The standard for sheetrock for commercial facilities is 5/8" thick.  If you place a correctly installed appropriate hollow-wall anchor into 5/8" sheetrock for every single bracket or wall strip anchor hole, you will attain the weight capacity mentioned earlier.

That being said, if you have the opportunity to hit studs or, even better, install blocking in the wall, that's great.  It can only make the installation stronger.  This is the equivalent of wearing suspenders with your belt.  From a safety standpoint, there's not a thing wrong with doing so.  It's just not absolutely necessary.

The biggest downside to these units is that you need to have someone mount your coat rack on the wall.  You'll need to drill holes in the wall, use surface-appropriate anchors, and get it straight and level.  There are many people, such as carpenters, who can easily do this, but it's not a skill that just everyone has on their resume.  However, if a person can hang three pictures in a row and have them all come out aligned with each other, they can likely hang a wall mounted coat rack.  Instructions are provided.

Portable?  Not in the least bit.  Yes, if you move from one location to another, you can remove these coat racks from the wall and reinstall them at the new site.  But overall, movement in an installed wall mounted coat rack is not a desirable thing and indicates the aforementioned "provided instructions" weren't followed.

Wall Coat Racks without Shelves

In most cases, a Wall Coat Rack without a Shelf is simply a wall mounted metal or wood panel with coat hooks already mounted on the panel. These types of coat racks are often called coat hook panels or coat hook strips.

In a few instances, you may find these with a coat hanger rod in addition to, or instead of, coat hooks.  However, in terms of capacity, usually a wall coat rack without a shelf is basically a coat tree attached to a wall. 

These don't take up much room and require no floor space.  They also tend to cost less than a coat tree, simply because they don't need the structure that enables a coat tree to be freestanding.

As noted earlier, wall mounted coat racks have greater weight capacities than any other type of coat rack.  In the case of the units without shelves, the reason for this is that the lever is short.  In other words, a properly anchored wall coat rack without a shelf doesn't have much leverage to pull it out of the wall.  This is just physics at work in your favor.

A charming aspect of these is that you can often match the other coat hooks you have in your facility.  Let's say you have an open area where most people hang up their coats on wall coat racks, but you also have private offices.  In many cases, you can find coat hooks which exactly match the style of the coat hooks on the wall coat racks.  Now, some folks may shrug at this.  Please be assured that the majority of design professionals are quite pleased with this feature, since it gives them an opportunity to maintain continuity of design.  That's the sort of thing design professionals work rather hard to accomplish. 

The final feature goes back to hanging capacity.  In some instances, these wall coat racks can be mounted end-to-end, changing everything earlier written about these units having the capacity of a coat tree.  To every rule, there are exceptions, eh?  In this case, the only limitation is the length of your wall.  However, if this is important to you, you may want to check out the next item: Wall Coat Racks with Shelves.

  • Pro: No Floor Space Requirement, Low Comparative Cost, Greater Weight Capacity, Easy Design Continuity
  • Con: Limited Capacity in Many Instances, Requires Installation, Immobile

Wall Coat Rack without Shelf

Wall Coat Racks with Shelves

You get the most bang for your buck with these.   Wall Coat Racks with Shelves deliver Unlimited Size.  Capacity is limited only by the amount of wall space you can dedicate to them. 

A feature of this type of coat rack is that some of these units can be cut to exact lengths, down to eighth inches.  If you have a wall which is 27'8-3/8" long that you want to fill, you can get a wall mounted coat rack custom-cut at the factory to that length.

If you're a facility manager needing to provide permanent hanging storage for dozens or even hundreds of people, this is the route to take.  All you need are walls of adequate length. 

The shelf provides overhead storage for things that don't fit on hangers or hooks.  The units can come with single or double shelves.  You can even provide another wall-mounted shelf below for storage of footwear, if need be.  After all, you're dedicating a wall, you may as well get all the utility you can out of that space. 

These units are available with either coat hanger rods or coat hooks. 

As to why these have the maximum weight capacity, the answer is very simple: There is a support bracket every couple of feet. 

  • Pros: Capacity Limited only by Wall Space, Comparatively Inexpensive, Greater Weight Capacity, Maximum Storage Options, Coat Hangers or Coat Hooks Options
  • Cons: Requires Installation, Immobile

Wall Coat Rack with Shelf

If you have questions or comments, please give us a call at 800-727-1485 or email us at info@avadenali.com.